Funds needed for Clinton Cemetery project

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Most communities in the Old West had a “Boot Hill,” a cemetery where people were buried “with their boots on.” De Witt County is no different. Located several miles south of Cuero on Highway 183, the Clinton Cemetery is the boot hill of DeWitt County. 
 
If the soft winds that drift through the Clinton Cemetery could speak, they would tell a tale of sturdy pioneer spirits, resilience, hardship, disease, and lawlessness. The Clinton Cemetery is an integral part of DeWitt County ‘s colorful history.
 
Soon after the Republic of Texas became the State of Texas, DeWitt County was formed from parts of Victoria, Gonzales, and Goliad counties. The first state legislature appropriated money to survey the county lines for DeWitt County in 1846. The survey was completed in that year, but there was some disagreement over the location of the county seat, and after several moves between the Cardwell Store at Cameron and the location owned by Richard Chisholm near the ferry he operated at the La Bahia Road crossing on the Guadalupe River, Clinton became the county seat in 1850 by vote of the people. 
 
Read more in this week's edition of the Record.
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